Benefits of Resistant Starch

Most complex carbohydrates are known as starch, which takes your body longer to digest. However, not all starch gets 100% digested. A small part of it can also get passed down to your gut undigested or unbroken, therefore being 'resistant' to digestion. Hence as the name describes, this type of starch is called resistant starch. 

So how does it work for....

...digestive health?

Resistant starch works as a soluble and fermentable fibre. It can improve insulin sensitivity as well as low blood sugar. It has shown to have a positive effect on digestion too! 

Once the starch resists digestion, it begins feeding the friendly gut bacteria present in the gut. This process promotes the production of short-chain fatty acids which includes Butyrate. As one of the short-chain fatty acids that fuels the cells, it improves the lining in the colon, reducing inflammation which reduces the risk of colon cancer. 

Remember that time you consistently felt acidic? Just bump up your resistant starch intake!

Resistant starch also has a highly beneficial effect on digestive disorders that include inflammatory bowel disease: ulcerative colitis & Crohn's disease. 

Improving your digestive health by eating right can really have a positive domino like effect on the rest of your body. 

...your weight?

Foods high in resistant starch have fewer calories compared to other starchy foods. This promotes feelings of fullness and helps you eat fewer calories, directly affecting weight management! Adding a good amount of resistant starch in your diet is one of the go-to solutions to boost weight loss. 

...your metabolism & sugar levels?

Resistant starch has a profound effect on Insulin sensitivity. Insulin is the hormone secreted by the pancreas that regulates the nutrients received into the blood stream, directly impacting your metabolism. 

Insulin sensitivity, in a nutshell, is when the cells in your body stop responding to insulin normally. High blood sugar levels increase the production of insulin, prompting cells to absorb the sugar for energy, however it isn't always a good thing; consistently high levels of sugar in the blood increases the risk of insulin resistance; cells become decreasingly sensitive to insulin overtime.

Struggling with high blood sugar is one of the common, modern & rising conditions today. That's why resistant starch is beneficial for those with high blood glucose! 

Leaving high blood sugar untreated can deteriorate health and cause several serious conditions such as problems in metabolic health, type 2 diabetes, heart disease or even Alzheimer’s! Studies have proven improvements in insulin sensitivity after 1 month of consistent resistant starch intake. 

Substituting refined carbohydrates and refined sugars with low glycemic index (GI) foods can reduce blood sugar levels, in turn improving insulin response. Directly impacting insulin sensitivity! 

What are High Resistant starch foods?  

  • Our raw, organic Baobab Powder is a great start! 75% of the food is a prebiotic fibre making it a great supplement for a healthy microbiome. 
  • A very special gluten-free organic green banana flour. Can easily be added to sweet or savoury dishes! If you haven't already seen the recipe by nutritionist, Thimpika from Soulsfood nutrition, the muffins are absolutely delicious and make a great snack! 
  • Organic orange sweet potato flour. Along with being a powerful prebiotic fibre it provides a good amount of micronutrients too!
  • Oats. The simplest and most convenient breakfast! 
  • Bambara Nuts. A legume with an incredible amount of fibre! Try our Organic, perfectly spiced Bam-Choco Latte. Other beans and legumes like soybeans, pinto or black beans, even garden peas, are all great resistant starch supplements. 

 

There are several more prebiotic rich and high resistant starch foods that can easily be implemented into a high carb, low calorie diet.

Whether you want to lose weight, want to maintain blood sugar levels, or just improve your digestive health. Resistant starch is one of the main nutrients to look out for, in the foods you eat.

The cookie settings on this website are set to 'allow all cookies' to give you the very best experience. Please click Accept Cookies to continue to use the site.
You have successfully subscribed!
This email has been registered